Public Policy Analysis

Associated Doctoral Faculty

  • Wyatt Thompson (program coordinator)
  • Julian Binfield
  • Scott Brown
  • Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes
  • Sarah Low
  • Raymond Massey
  • Laura McCann
  • William Meyers
  • Joe Parcell
  • Teo Skevas
  • Patrick Westhoff
  • Jarrett Whistance
  • Abner Womack

Knowledge and Skills of Graduates

Graduates will have an understanding of core economic concepts, particularly microeconomics, and be able to relate them to real problems of policy, innovation, and market analysis. Students will be introduced to quantitative methods to develop a toolkit that they can use to approach a variety of problems. The goal is to train applied economists who can exploit data and other information, however limited, to answer questions that matter. As part of their studies graduates will have worked with faculty that are involved at the highest level in the application of advanced economic techniques in the analysis of policy and markets.

Graduates will be in a position to take on the challenges of applied economic research and teaching at universities or to conduct applied economic analysis to support decision making in government and industry. Graduates of the program have earned academic, government, private sector, and non-governmental organization jobs.

MS Degree Program (total 30 hours)

Degree requirements

Core courses: 18 hours

  • Intermediate microeconomics (Econ 7351, Econ 7332, or AgEc 7240)
  • Econ 7353 Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • Econometrics (Econ 7371, Stat 7510, or equivalent)
  • An additional 7000-level or higher econometrics, stat, or math course

Two of the following courses according to specialization

  • AgEc 8265 Food and Agricultural Policy
  • AgEc 9230 Welfare and Consumption Economics
  • AgEc 9220 Price and Market Analysis
  • AgEc 9265 Innovation and Regulatory Policy

Electives: 6 hours

  • Consistent with specialization

Thesis or non-thesis: 6 hours

  • If thesis track, then AgEc 8090 Masters Thesis Research
  • If non-thesis track, then additional coursework in specialization

Notes

Degree requirements include core courses as well as additional courses and research to develop knowledge and skills that constitute a specialization in applied economic analysis of such topics as policies, markets, consumer demand, production and business strategies, regulations, and innovation.

Specific courses can be substituted with approval by advisor and program coordinator. Students are responsible for meeting all requirements of the department, division, and university. Students must have at least 30 credit hours from courses numbered 7000-9000 of which 15 credit hours must be from courses numbered 8000-9000 and no more than 40% of credits from problems, readings or research hours.

PhD Program (total 72 hours)

Degree requirements

Theory core courses: 15 hours

  • Advanced Microeconomic Theory I (AgEc 9040 or Econ 9451)
  • Advanced Microeconomic Theory II (AgEc 9042 or Econ 9452)
  • AgEc 9230 Welfare and Consumer Economics

Two of the following courses according to specialization

  • AgEc 8265 Food and Agricultural Policy
  • AgEc 9220 Price and Market Analysis
  • AgEc 9265 Innovation and Regulatory Policy

Methods core courses: 9 hours

  • AgEc 8510 Research Methods and Design

At least two other quantitative methods courses consistent with specialization including basic statistical methods as well as econometrics, statistics, math, mathematical programming, survey methods, or similar (e.g., Econ 7371, Econ 8472, Econ 8473, Econ 9446, Econ 9473, Econ 9474, Econ 9476, Econ 9477, Stat 8220)

Dissertation research: 12 hours

  • AgEc 9090 Doctoral Dissertation Research

Electives: 36 hours

Examinations

The Qualifying Examination process to be set by members of this EA and can take such forms as a written examination, problem sets, or experiments, provided at least two EA affiliates play a role in assessment. Welfare, the first courses of Micro and methods sequences (first course of either sequence of econ 7371 and econ 8473, or stat 8310 and stat 8320) are initial courses and qualifying exam subjects, unless advisor and coordinator determined otherwise. The Comprehensive Examination will be at the end of coursework, following written and oral proposal, with exam format to be determined by committee. The Comprehensive Examination must be completed at least seven months before the final dissertation defense.

Notes

Degree requirements include core courses as well as additional courses and research to develop knowledge and skills that constitute a specialization on such topics as policies, markets, consumer demand, production and business strategies, regulations, and innovation. Specific courses can be substituted with approval by advisor and coordinator.

Students are responsible for meeting all requirements of the department, division, and university, including the requirement to have at least 72 credit hours from courses numbers 7000-9000, as well as the maximum share of credit hours from research, readings, and problems courses. No more than 30 credit hours may be transferred in from MS.